Weber State University Homeschooled Student Early College and Regular Admittance; and Scholarships

Today I visited Weber State University and met with multiple experts on campus. This university has different rules for different situations. I think I got it cleared up today. None of this is on their website. It is all information you have to beg for, investigate and really dig hard to get. I really think it would be better for them to post all of these things clearly on their web site and for them to print all of these things in a brochure made specifically for the homeschooled!

Weber State University Academic Scholarships for Homeschooled Candidates

The following are requirements for Homeschooled Candidates only:

Presidential Scholarship

ACT composite 31+

8 semesters, tuition & fees, valued at $25,000

Trustee’s Scholarship

ACT composite 27-30

2 semesters, $1,750 per semester

Dean’s Scholarship

ACT composite 23-26

2 semesters, $1,000 per semester

Keep in mind, applying for scholarships every year is my recommendation. Even if a candidate only receives a 1 year scholarship, they may apply for and receive another one each year following that first year. My husband did that. My husband also received a $1,000 scholarship from a non-profit organization. Applying for one scholarship each week is a good idea, in my opinion. A candidate may put one scholarship on top of another. It will save even more money.

Early College Admittance for Homeschooled Students 10th through 12th Grades (Ages 14-18)

A candidate who is a Sophomore, Junior or Senior who is Homeschooling High School can be admitted to the Early College program with a 21 composite score on the ACT. No GED exam is necessary. When the candidate is a minor (under 18), they must also have the permission of their parent or legal guardian to be admitted to the program.

Regular Admittance (not in Early College Program) of the Homeschooled, to Weber State University, (Ages 16-18)

To be admitted at an early age (before the time when peer high school class would be graduating from high school), candidates must have ACT score of 21 and must pass each GED exam with at least a 145 and have a total for all GED exams of 600. The GED exams cannot be taken until the candidate is aged 16. When the candidate is a minor (under 18), they must also have the permission of their parent or legal guardian to be admitted.

Regular Admittance of the Homeschooled, to Weber State University, at least the year after the peer graduating class has graduated, ages 18 or 19+

When the candidate is one year beyond the year when his or her peers have graduated from High School, the homeschooled candidate must either:

1) Candidate has an ACT score of 21 to be admitted (36 is the highest possible score); Or,

2) Candidate must have passed each GED exam with at least a 145 and have a total for all GED exams of 600. (There are 4 exams, which may be taken on separate days. The highest possible score on each exam is 200. The highest possible total score is 800.)

Dec. 2, 2017 (In answer to a question about FAFSA for children)

FAFSA: Early College students and those attending before the age of 18 can get federal financial student aid (FAFSA). Students under the age of 18 must have a co-signer to apply for FAFSA and must not be enrolled in a public school or a charter school, because they are federally funded just like the FAFSA and a person cannot be receiving benefits from 2 federally funded programs at the same time.

Sources:

1) This article from HSLDA (Homeschool Legal Defense Association) explains that homeschooled candidates do not need a GED to be consider to be high school graduates. They just need a homeschool diploma.

2) I spoke with Mona Lisa Harding on the phone on 12-1-17 and she told me all of her kids, even one starting college at age 10 and a half, got FAFSA. She said they would not have been able to afford college had they not used FAFSA, because they are a (financially) poor family. Mona Lisa and her husband Kip wrote a book called “The Brainy Bunch,” and have a website as well. They are very kind, helpful people who are amazing, yet who act like they are not amazing or extraordinary at all (as humble as any people could possibly be). I highly recommend their book. Even if you don’t do what they do, it is a great resource for all homeschool parents! She also said we should only give our money to homeschool-friendly junior colleges, colleges and univeristies, and that I need to find out from all the local higher education schools, which ones love homeschooled candidates the most, and support those ones. She recommends making sure that our kids know how to regularly write a good 5 paragraph essay, have written a 5 page research report with a bibliography, have completed courses in Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry in homeschool. She urges us to have created for our child a High School transcript showing completion of classes recommended by the Junior Colleges or Community Colleges in our area, or which we plan to have our children attend online. She uses and Excel Spreadsheet for her childrens’ transcripts. She gave me so very much great advice and has even more in her book and on her website, and an opportunity to pay her for a phone consultation! The Brainy Bunch book website

Please read this great article written by Lee Binz about how to determine whether a college or university is homeschool friendly. I love this article!

Additional communication from Weber State University:

December 2, 2017

Rachael Combe sent me an E-mail that said:

“No, from my knowledge we will not be considering GED scores in the near future.  We realize that not all students have the same testing capabilities.  If your daughter believes that she should be considered for a higher scholarship based on other factors aside from her ACT results, she can write a statement to scholarship@weber.edu requesting consideration.  The Financial Aid and Scholarship Appeals Committee will then evaluate her eligibility.”

That is good news! I am glad there is a way for homeschooled candidates to present their other accomplishments for consideration by a scholarship appeals committee. That is very good information! Since public schooled candidates have GPA’s as well as an ACT, it is rough for our children to have everything weighted on only their ACT score! It really is unfair. The fact that they have such an appeals committee is a good thing! It is too bad that no Admissions Appeals Committee has been mentioned. Rachael from the scholarship office said that there are scholarships for those who receive a 15-17 and a 17-20 on their ACT. This indicates that these people are admitted with these low scores, when our homeschooled children must each receive an ACT composite score of 21 to be admitted! This is very off-balance. It makes me think that this university is not very homeschool friendly.


Sources:

Scott Teichert, Director of Admissions, Weber State University, 11-30-2017 (Student Services Center)

Samantha Burroghs, Academic Advisor (Early College Program) at Weber State University, 11-30-2017 (Student Services Center)

Rachael Combe, Weber State Academics and Merit Scholarship Specialist, Weber State University, 11-30-2017 (E-mail)

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Weber State University’s and Utah State University’s Requirements for the Acceptance of Homeschooled In-Coming Students

I have new information for you about how a homeschooled person can be accepted as a student at Weber State University. I got this information from a phone call to the admittance office yesterday.

The student applying can be accepted for admittance if one of the following applies:

  • The person applying has passed (145 out of 200) all 4 G.E.D. Exams and the total for all 4 exams is 600 out of a possible 800.
  • The person applying has a 21 composite score for the ACT exam.

This is significant, because Weber State has always told people that there is only one requirement, which is the ACT score one. This time, however, I had just finished speaking on the phone with admissions from Utah State University. They helped me to understand that a G.E.D. score, on the Index Scoring system, can be equivalent to a GPA. That means a perfect score of 800 on the GED exam is just like a 4.0 average overall GPA!

By the way, to get into Utah State University as a homeschooled person, one must meet one of the following requirements.:

  • The person’s parent has created a High School Transcript and the person has scored a 17 on the ACT exam.
  • The person has a total GED score of 660, having passed all 4 tests, and the person has scored a 17 on the ACT exam.

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

1 bag Boca Vegan Crumbles (WFPB dieters, use lentils. They are great, too. I have done it.)

6 c. Mashed Potatoes with skins on, dehydrated from freezer on stove

1 can Kirkland Green Beans

1 can diced tomatoes

1/2 cup ThriveLife celery, rehydrated on stove

1 can beets

2 shakes of onion powder

2 shakes basil

A few ground peppercorns

2 shakes rosemary

2 shakes dill

2 T Annie’s Vegan Worchestershire sauce (WFPB can substitute something)

3 T Grapeseed oil (WFPBNO can substitute vegetable broth)

2 shakes garlic

This is yummy!

Early Literacy in Homeschool

Here is my video on YouTube about teaching little kids to read and write with the Montessori Method and with Preschool Prep Co. mini books. Enjoy!

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Early Literacy in Homeschool

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Vegan at La Puente Mexican Restaurant, Ogden

Great place for VEGANS!

My husband and I went to La Puente Mexican Restaurant in Ogden. I asked detailed questions, so you don’t have to!

Get the pinto beans that are not refried beans. They have them and will do that. Get a taco salad in a bowl, with no wheat shell. Get corn tortilla chips on the side for it. Get lettuce, cilantro, olives, fresh red and green bell peppers, tomatoes and avocadoes on it.

Their guac is vegan but it is easier for them to just get you sliced avocadoes for your custom order. The wheat flour tortillas are made with lard. The rice has chicken broth in it (just like Javier’s). The refried beans come sometimes from one supplier and sometimes from another (not made in-house). Some weeks, they get it from a supplier that says it is cooked in vegetable oil. Other weeks, they get it from a supplier that cooks it in lard. They know whihc supplie they get it from, so when you go, you could actually get refried beans if they got it that week from the supplier that cooks it in vegetable oil.

Enjoy!

I liked this place over Javier’s because Javier’s does not give me all those vegetables on my custom salad. They only give me lettuce and (not many) tomatoes. They also accidentally gave me rice on the side at Javier’s, which has the chicken broth in it. This La Puente made no mistakes and was happy to give me plenty of veggies! Yay for them!

When you go and you order, be sure to tell the host, the server, the manager, or whomever you see (all of them) that you are a vegan and want this vegan special you read about on facebook.

1- Get “O-Town Vegan Taco Salad” on the menu, please!

2- We are a large community (325 members on O-Town Vegan on facebook, I see) of vegans!

Classroom Set-Up: Back to Relaxed Mormon Homeschool

It is that time of year again. School teachers and Homeschool moms are very busy right now. It is time to plan for the upcoming academic year of 2017-18. It will be another new and exciting academic year for all of us. It is a very exciting time of year. It is a time to start fresh and look forward to newness and think of how things will be different this year. There is always a hope that each year will be better, easier. There is a great aspiration to have a better set-up which will make finding things easier, which will make us able to do things we do repeatedly and often, more efficiently, and which will make everyone feel in the mood to enjoy togetherness, make friends (or become closer as a family), learn and do school work.


I am well aware that public school and charter school teachers are getting ready as well as homeschool moms like me. My parents were public school teachers until they retired, and I know they were starting to prepare for the new academic year at this time. In my local school district, the first teacher contract day is in a week and a day. Generally, my mom and dad worked at least 3-4 days not on their contract, before the school year began. It is likely that this coming Monday, many Weber County School District teachers will show up at their school, unlock their classroom which has rested from teacher eyes all summer, and will sigh, stare at the walls and cabinets and wonder where they will start in setting up their classrooms.


I remember all those years helping my mom and dad set up. Even for me, as a child and as an adult, it was exciting. I loved making sure all the new pencils were sharpened, and that every desk had a name label, a spelling book, a math book, a science book, a language arts book and a social studies book, along with a new pencil, a new ruler and a new box of pencils. Now I am a homeschool mom teaching my large family of children preschool through tenth this year. I have purchased many school supplies. I have yet to purchase more needed supplies, but for the most part, I have the supplies. We have one table in the homsechool room, so I do not set books there or put name labels on for the kids. I put books and supplies in the homeschool cabinets, lined up and organized nicely, ready for what we will be studying this year.


I have switched out the science focus. Although I hired out for science, I have science books in the homeschool room for when I say that today, I want them to pick a non-fiction science, geography or history book and read it, or when, for language arts, I want them to use non-fiction books to do a research report.


When my public school teacher parents were getting ready for the new year, there was much de-junking and organizing. There wasn’t recycling. They only had garbage cans, but much went into the trash. My homeschool room has to be newly de-junked and papers filed and put away or recycled. I have one full box of school papers my mom gave me and one full blue bin of papers I put in the bin from all the years of homeschooling combined. I have to go through them. Don Aslett called it “the paper tiger” in his book about de-cluttering the office. A homeschool room is very much like an office, but we do have a separate room for the office.  It is needed for my homeschool file cabinet, homeschool workbooks I photocopy, my computer and pur 4-in-1 machine which photocopies, scans and prints. 


I am also making plans for creating more for other teachers to use in my Teachers Pay Teachers store. All of you who are reading this and who have created any tool for a teacher to use (public school teachers, charter school teachers and homeschool teachers) may wish to open a Teachers Pay Teachers store and sell the tools they have made. You can sign up here. It is free to start, (although you will make more money per item if you have a paid annual plan).


Teachers pay teachers referral link

Kayse Morris: Teachers Pay Teachers, for beginners (How to make it look good so it will 

Just make what you need for your own family or classroom 

Suggested Blogposts:

Whole House Home Ed Organization

Homeschool Dailies
LDS Homeschooling
Transgenderism and Homosexuality in Utah Schools Starting with 2017-18
Humanism is a Religion

My Vegan Conversion Story

GoVeg.org had a home page with a challenge back in about 2006 to go vegetarian or vegan for a week, a month or 3 months (your choice. Oprah had talked about the challenge on her show. There was an article in my local paper about Oprah’s show, and a challenge to go to goveg.org and “take the challenge.” I did it for fun, but to also see whether it would be healthy for me. There were many options on the challenge website. I chose the easiest, which was the commitment and challenge to go vegetarian for a week. My depression and anxiety lifted. My body felt lighter. I was less constipated. I decided to go out a month. I decided if it had done this much in a week, it could do even more in a month!

Next, I read Alicia Silverstone’s “The Kind Diet.” I wanted to go vegan but was not used to being vegetarian yet. I decided when I was good at vegetarianism, I would take the next step, veganism. I figured out that tofu could be yummy.

2.5 years later, I decided to go vegan. It was not as hard as I had thought it would be. I decided I hated soy milk and soy cheese. I tried rice milk and rice tease and loved them. I learned about egg substitutes like ground flax seeds and applesauce.

The rest is history. 8.5 yrs. a vegan I credit to that challenge on Peta’s home page, a local paper guest columnist and Oprah’s talk show episode on the “goveg” challenge. I also give credit to “The Kind Diet,” by Alicia Silverstone.

For evey human, I recommend these documentaries from Netflix:

1) Food, Inc.

2) What the Health?

3) Forks Over Knives

4) Forks Over Knives: The Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue