Vegan Restaurant Review: Cuppa (Ogden, UT)

My friends told me to come to this place, but it was difficult to find. Their logo, which is the word “cuppa” written in black in lowercase American Typewriter font, is on the brick on the building, very small. It is difficult to spot. There is no lit up sign. There is no big sign. There is no white behind “cuppa” for contrast, which, as a logo designer, I recommend they do next time. Contrast would at least help a bit more! Size would also help. BIGGER! Lit up would help, too. Young Electric Sign Company could help them with that, when they can afford it!

I was not expecting a 100% vegan, 100% certified organic café, but that is what I got. On the back of a gift card they have for people to purchase, it says, “A café for creatives.” There is a great selection of yummy vegan food. I had the Street Tacos, which include jackfruit, with added sprouts. It was yummy. My husband had a Sloppy Joe made with jackfruit, with chips. The chips were vegan barbecue chips, which I assume are Kettle brand (those are vegan) and apple chips. I had some chips. They were good. This was very delicious food.

I snapped some photos for you! Brigham City, Odgen, Layton, Salt Lake and Logan vegans, come check out this café called Cuppa. It’s great! Cuppa is at 552 E. 25th Street in Ogden. It is next to the former Deseret Gym which is also a former part of the original Weber College. It is across the street (to the west) from the Weber County Library System’s Main Branch (currently closed for renovation).

If you are in the Ogden area and are a vegan, please also join our facebook group, “O-Town Vegan.” It is not owned by me but I post there often. It is a great way to connect with local vegans and to find out about grocery stores and restaurants for vegans. If anyone wishes to help us start up an “Anonymous for the Voiceless” for Ogden, please come onto O-Town Vegan on facebook and help us with that. I want to participate in one here in the Ogden area so badly!

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

1 bag Boca Vegan Crumbles (WFPB dieters, use lentils. They are great, too. I have done it.)

6 c. Mashed Potatoes with skins on, dehydrated from freezer on stove

1 can Kirkland Green Beans

1 can diced tomatoes

1/2 cup ThriveLife celery, rehydrated on stove

1 can beets

2 shakes of onion powder

2 shakes basil

A few ground peppercorns

2 shakes rosemary

2 shakes dill

2 T Annie’s Vegan Worchestershire sauce (WFPB can substitute something)

3 T Grapeseed oil (WFPBNO can substitute vegetable broth)

2 shakes garlic

This is yummy!

Vegan at La Puente Mexican Restaurant, Ogden

Great place for VEGANS!

My husband and I went to La Puente Mexican Restaurant in Ogden. I asked detailed questions, so you don’t have to!

Get the pinto beans that are not refried beans. They have them and will do that. Get a taco salad in a bowl, with no wheat shell. Get corn tortilla chips on the side for it. Get lettuce, cilantro, olives, fresh red and green bell peppers, tomatoes and avocadoes on it.

Their guac is vegan but it is easier for them to just get you sliced avocadoes for your custom order. The wheat flour tortillas are made with lard. The rice has chicken broth in it (just like Javier’s). The refried beans come sometimes from one supplier and sometimes from another (not made in-house). Some weeks, they get it from a supplier that says it is cooked in vegetable oil. Other weeks, they get it from a supplier that cooks it in lard. They know whihc supplie they get it from, so when you go, you could actually get refried beans if they got it that week from the supplier that cooks it in vegetable oil.

Enjoy!

I liked this place over Javier’s because Javier’s does not give me all those vegetables on my custom salad. They only give me lettuce and (not many) tomatoes. They also accidentally gave me rice on the side at Javier’s, which has the chicken broth in it. This La Puente made no mistakes and was happy to give me plenty of veggies! Yay for them!

When you go and you order, be sure to tell the host, the server, the manager, or whomever you see (all of them) that you are a vegan and want this vegan special you read about on facebook.

1- Get “O-Town Vegan Taco Salad” on the menu, please!

2- We are a large community (325 members on O-Town Vegan on facebook, I see) of vegans!

Try Vegan Milks

Try vegan milks. All of the nutrition and yumminess, none of the cruelty.

See this video

My New Weight Loss Plan: Chilean Lunches, Light Dinners and More Gym Time

I am really upset about my weight. I am making a new weight loss plan. The size of the middle of my body (belly and waist) is too great. I just recently learned that my nighttime acid reflux issue was caused by my habits of:

  • Skipping breakfast (because I was busy) quite often, or having a breakfast that was more like a light snack
  • Skipping lunch (because I was busy) quite often, or having a light snack for lunch at noon
  • Eating a medium-sized “Linner” (between 2 and 4 p.m.)
  • Eating a gigantic, very filling (and yet very nutritious) very late dinner (between 8 and 11:30 p.m.)
  • Going to bed within an hour or two of eating the late dinner

     Since I have at one time in my life, though about half a lifetime ago, experienced Chile style lunches, I am going to try that again now. I read online that this mid-day largest meal of the day style is great for nutrition, energy to accomplish more and weight loss, I am going to be doing this. 

     I have already done it for 2 days with success. I had larger breakfasts. The biggest meals of the day have been at about noon. I have had a snack between about 2 and 4 p.m. I have had dinner between 5 and 7:30 p.m. Dinner has consisted of fruits and vegetables, including a lettuce salad both nights. I have gone to bed at around 10:30 both nights. I have had no acid reflux in the middle of the night and no heartburn.

     In Chile, oatmeal was the most common breakfast food, but there was also a barley drink, milk and or or herbal tea and mermelada, which is jam.

     From what I remember of Chilean lunches, there were courses. There was first the light, brothy, healthy soup. Then there was the salad, consisting of Romaine lettuce and lots of veggies. Then there was the bread with the main course. It was very large and very filling. After we were finished eating, it was then polite to drink. It was a fruity or vegetable drink (such as mango or carrot juice). Finally, it was time for dessert, which I did not generally feel there was room for. Fruit, like a pear, was considered a dessert in my first home. That was a healthier example of dessert.

     At about 6 p.m., no matter where we were, we were fed. Nobody cared that we were strangers. It was time to eat. At this time, we were fed something like a snack-meal. This consisted of bread with mermelada or paté and barley drink with milk and honey in it. Sometimes we were given popcorn or a fruit instead. Sometimes, it was just dessert, such as a 13 layer whipped cream, cake, caramel and jam “torta.” Finishing the torta meant you still had room for more. The ony way you could get out of having more was to politely almost finish it, then say your stomach could not fit any more. In one area that I lived in, there was Alicia’s in Santiago, which had the yummiest single serve small pizza (peek-sah), and sometimes we splurged and bought it. Alicia was our good friend and became a member of the church while I was there. I promised to make her a logo but have no contact information that works. If her place is still up and running, you have to taste her pizza.

     At 11 p.m., it was time for “once,” (which means “eleven.”) This was also given to us no matter whose house we were in. To the Chileans, serving strangers was a special honor and privilege. At once, we were given the bread with paté or mermelada and the barley drink. Some people served large, thick crackers or bread, with cheese and sliced meat. Generally, one piece of thick, hearty bread was sliced in half so that it was like eating a sandwich.

     My diet plan is to have a big, healthy breakfast, a very large and healthy lunch, a healthy snack and a very light, healthy dinner. My exercise plan is to go to the gym more, work hard on house and yard care for exercise and ride my stationary bike whenever I can. I hope all of this works and I finally lose my large “middle” (belly or waist) and replace it with a medium “middle.”

Pearson: Animal Cruelty Supporter

Pearson c. 2002 Spelling Workout C

p. 5: How to cook ostrich eggs. You could make egg salad. It could make as many as 20 sandwiches. “That’s quite a meal!”

p. 40, #5: “Those trained elephants are really snart” {This is for editing. The spelling word is “smart.” My son put in “torchered” instead of “smart.” Good catch, son! He is the one that brought all this to my attention by doing that! I am pleased with him for catching and noticing that!”}

p.  41: mention of “ponies in a race” and “round up time;” photo of a person riding a bucking horse in a rodeo

p. 45: mention that prairie dogs give farmers trouble

I am vegan so this bothers me. hope PETA sees this. I tried to comment on their web site and there is a glitch, so it just kept erasing all my work (boo hoo). I hope PETA agrees that what our kids see in their textbooks, they learn from and believe to be good, right, acceptable and accurate.

Pearson (curriculum publishing company) has no place for me to write to them or call them about the content of their textbooks or workbooks. They only have methods of contact for schools to buy large numbers of texts. It appears they only care about money. If someone from Pearson (such as a marketing director, public relations, editor, curriculum writer) gets this message, please input it into the system and tell the people who can make a change there in their books, in order to take animal cruelty out of your curricula! Thanks!

PETA, if you see this, contact Pearson. Perhaps you know how to do so. Perhaps they will fear you enough to care about what you say. Thanks!

Water Your Plants As You Do Dishes, Laundry, Baths and Showers!

I do not have this but I want it. What a great idea! When I first read Alicia Silverstone’s post about this, I thought she was hauling buckets of water from the bathtub. I thought that was ridiculous. That is not how she does it. She had this system called a Greywater System installed. Water your plants with the wastewater from baths and laundry and dishes! Check it out!

Youtube: DIY Installing a Greywater System for your garden or landscape

Vegan at the Cracker Barrel

Vegan at the Cracker Barrel seem a bit impossible? Well, I did it last night. Of course, I had to have the manager come out and arrange special things for me and discuss what things are vegan.

It turns out they cook their sprouts with ham, their pinto beans have ham in them, they cook most of their veggies and even their rice in beef broth, and much more. At least they were honest!

However, I ordered a garden salad which has a vegan dressing, a plain baked potato, corn with no margarine and a fresh seasonal fruit dish. The  at the last minute, she mentioned that one manager she knew was vegan and loved their granola (which they usually put on the yogurt). That sounded great, so I ordered that (no yogurt).

My faves were the garden salad, baked potato and granola. The granola had dried berries, oatmeal and almonds. It was delicious and seemed very healthy. The baked potato was huge and the garden salad was so yummy. I used some of the dressing that was for the salad, for my baked potato. I also added a bit of salt and a bit of pepper to it.

So you can eat vegan there. I sent them a comment on their website thanking them for being hospitable and helpful (some restaurants aren’t). I also asked them to have a “special diets” section in their menu with a “vegan” subsection. I asked them for veggie and rice options without butter or beef broth. I suggested they cook rice in vegetable broth.

I Ate the Vegan Black Bean Burger at Scrud’s Restaurant in Utah

I just ate at this place called Scrud’s in Utah and they had a great Vegan Black Bean Burger. I was told the bun is even vegan. I had tomato, lettuce, pickles and avocado on it. I had the side salad “with no cheese and no bacon.” I did not have fries. The black bean burger does not touch a grill or a fryer, but everything that does (fries, other burgers, etc.) comes in contact with LARD, FYI. Ask for a bun with no butter, too. I had to ask for one after they had brought me one with butter on it.

Anyway, it was a BIG, tasty vegan black bean burger! It did not taste dry like the one at Wendy’s. It had corn, green peppers and tomatoes chopped up in it. The beans seemed very fresh. They were not formed into a compact, had been frozen, type “patty” of beans. It is a huge chunk-bunch of fresh, delicious, moist, juicy mixture spread onto the bun. It is 10 times better than the (expensive) cheap, low quality, dry, tiny black bean burger at Wendy’s, so please go to Scrud’s instead of Wendy’s if you want to be more pleased!

Of course, if you want to encourage Wendy’s, at least try theirs once. Then tell them it is great but just costs too much for the value given. Just keep in mind that we do buy dried beans and cook them so we know they do not cost very much. We are willing to pay over $4.00 for this child-sized sandwich to test it and make other reataurants also wish to put out vegan items. However, on a regular basis, we are not going to run in, to pay over $4 for a sandwich that leaves us hungry. We are aware that beans do not cost much. I am positive Wendy’s buys dried beans in bulk to make these. Granted, I know that hiring expensive dieticians and chefs, patenting a new black bean burger and getting it PETA approved cannot be easy or cheap. I will give you that, Wendy’s.

Scrud’s is a small chain with 4 restaurant locations and it is kicking Wendy’s butt on this, though. Come on, Wendy’s. You can do better than that with all the money you have! Don’t let a tiny chain beat you in the butt and make you look, well, “cheap.”

Recommended Vegan Values Childrens Books For Your Homeschool

The Lorax

Horton Hears a Who

The Secret Garden

Hubert the Pudge

My Mom Eats Tofu

The Giving Tree

Benji Bean Sprout Doesn’t Eat Meat

Saving Emily

Real Superheroes Eat Tofu

Plants Feed Me

The Magic Finger, Roald Dahl

Not a Nugget

Charlotte’s Web

The Mouse and the Motorcycle

How to Eat a Rainbow

National Geographic Safari

Counting Safari Adventure

Blocky book set: Safari Friends

Baby Animals on Safari 1&2

Safari: a Photicular book

Dive In!

National Geographic: Dive!

Magic Schoolbus takes a Dive

SkippyJohn Jones Takes a Dive

Deap Sea Dive

Deep-Diving Submarines

Yellowstone: Eye of the Grizzly

Yellowstone National Park: An A,B,C Adventure

Bugling Elk and Sleeping Grizzlies

When the Wolves Returned

Big Mammals of Yellowstone for Kids

Yellowstone and Grand ateton Babies

Snow School

Grey Wolves: Return to Yellowstone

Yellowstone Moose

Deep in the Swamp

The Swamp Where Gator Hides

In the Small, Small Pond

Song of the Water Boatman

Butternut Hollow Pond

“One Small Square” habitats series

Here is the Coral Reef

The Hidden Forest, Jeanine Baker

Down, Down, Down by Steve Jenkins

Here is the Southwestern Desert

Way Out in the Desert

Desert Giant

Creatures of the Desert World

Rocky Mountains Plants and Animals

Good Night Mountains

Color the Wild Rockies: Discover the Great Outdoors

Rocky Mountain Wildlife

Rocky Mountain ABC’s

Good Night Texas

Sounds of the Wild: Forest

Moose, By Meryl Magby

Grandpa Skates with a Bear

Hyenas: On the Hunt

A Hummingbird Miracle

In Denali: A Photographic Essay

Ice Bear

Whales and Dolphins

An Octopus is Amazing

What It’s Like to Be a Fish

In the Sea

Whales

The Blue Whale

National Geographic Kids: Penguins

National Geographic Explore: Penguins

National Geographic Kids: Frogs

Antelope, Bison, Cougar: A National Wildlife Alphabet Book

National Geographic Kids: Pandas

Llamas and Other Latin American Camels

South American Animals, by Karen Arnold

Amazing Animals Series: Rhinoceroses

Animals in Danger in Asia

Peacocks for Kids

Cheetahs for Kids

Gorilla Mountain: The Story of Wildlife Biologist Amy Vedder

Animal Atlas

Tiger Rescue

I See a Kookabura!

National Geographic: Mission: Elephant Rescue

African Animals: Elephants

Elephant by Suzie Eszerthas

Marine Habitats: Life in Saltwater

Beaks!

Life in a Rainforest

Life in the Temperate Grasslands

Life on the Tundra

Kangaroo Island: Wild Habitat: The Story of An Australian Mallee Forest

Finding Home 

Chimaka the Chimpanzee

Mia the Meerkat

Destination: Australia

Kangaroos, by Sara kras

The Forest in th Clouds

Explore the Tropical Rainforest

Talking With The Animals: Patti Summer