The Calculus of Regional Public Transit and Bus Transportation

Wow. This person likes math. From the post, I think this person lives in Germany. Locally, there is a push by the Wasach Front Regional Council, for encouraging people to walk, use bikes more and use the bus system (UTA, the Utah Transit Authority) more. There are Regional Planning Meetings in order to give us more bike lanes and make the region more walkable and more bikeable. I don’t think they care about more “personal vehicle-able.”

This linked post is about the calculus and predictablility of bus riding, including how to prevent “bunching.” It is fascinating that anyone has a brain that can do this.

Read this person’s next blog post down, which is a orevious one, too. It talks about biometric data being stored in a card used to pay for public transportation as a way to make the German people (who like privacy) feel like their privacy is not being taken, while still assuring people pay for their public transportation.

“Pedestrian Observations” blog

If you want to know about these regional planning meetings, which are available the to the public, go to your city building and look for a posting hung there about it. These meetings will not be on facebook, twitter, in your city newsletter, or advertised on the radio or televisions. As a matter of fact, although they will reassure you they are open to the public, these are meetings they’d rather you did not attend. After all, they are meetings about how much more they can spend, which will increase your taxes. Why would they want to invite you?!? You have to be a Sherlock Holmes to find out when and where these public meetings are held. Do it. Know what is going on. Know why your taxes are going up. It’s not as if they want to tell you the truth. By “they” I mean your mayor, your city planner, the city planning commission, your city council members and the UTA.

My Haul of the Day: Wonderful Math Books for Homeschooling!

I am so excited about these math books for this coming academic year! They look awesome!

Homeschool Math: My Goals for Teaching My Kids

Math Homeschool

I prefer that my kids learn math in this order:

-First, that they master general math, including the memorization of times tables, division tables and knowing how to subtract and add well, very quickly; They learn that math is fun.

-Second, that they master real world math they will need as children; They learn that they need math for life

-Third, that they master mental math (doing math in their heads so they can figure things quickly without using paper)

-Fourth, that they master any math skills they will need to function successfully as adults

-Fifth, Pre-Algebra with no calculator

-Sixth, Algebra with no calculator

-Seventh, Plane Geometry and Trigonometry with no calculator

-Eighth, Using Math with science, for physics chemistry, etc., with a calculator as needed

-Ninth, Algebra II: Using a calculator for graphing and more complex algebra

-Tenth, Pre-Calculus, Statistics or Personal Finance (a choice)

-Eleventh, ACT math: pass the ACT with a score of 26 in math (not absolutely necessary)

-Thelfth, Pass the GED math test

-Thirteenth, complete University Graduation Requirements for math

Changing Improper Fractions into Mixed Numerals: a Book by Lisa C. Jackson

Changing Improper Fractions into Mixed Numerals
I wrote this book because I suspect my child has dyscalculia. I am trying to prepare my child-student for the TABE and GED tests. I am hoping this will help people with dyscalculia and those who teach them. I think this book will be helpful to 5th grade school teachers, homeschool moms, middle school and junior high and high school teachers, adult education teachers and those learning math for the GED test.

This is how this book came to be:

  • My dad always taught us math around the dinner table and everywhere we went. My siblings and I helped him check math papers quite often. I was always reading and hearing maht vocabulary like “whole numbers,” “improper fractions,” and “numerator.” My dad loved teaching math to 5th graders. This is considered 5th grade math in most curricula.
  • When I had a hard time understanding math, I had my school teacher, my dad and my math-loving brother who could explain everything to me. I did not need visual explanations of things because I had so much help.
  • However, I am an artist and visuals like these with very concise explanation of every little detail would have been nice.
  • When I was in elementary school, I visualized how the design of the math textbook could improve. I dreamed of becoming a textbook math designer one day just to make the math book easier for the child to understand by adding better visuals.
  • I became a homeschool mom. I have taught homeschool 5 years and have not yet found all the answers for how to teach math concepts to every child. 
  • For 5 years, I have been eluded as to how to explain certain things which are very easy for me to understand, to children to whom these math concepts do not come so readily.
  • I became determined to figure out how to help children (and all people) understand math concepts better.
  • I love the Montessori method. I want to meet Maria Montessori when I get to heaven. I also love Constance Kamii and her methods for teaching math.
  • I am an eclectic-style homeschool mom. That means I like teaching using multiple methods. 
  • I used my “Your Teacher” app yesterday and wrote down all of the lesson names in all of the chapters in each grade level and math level, with checkboxes nest to each lesson. I made a plan to have my kids watch 5 lessons per day from this app. I knew this would help. It did, because helped me to see which pieces of the puzzle my children were missing for the complete understanding of these math concepts regarding fractions.
  • I googled this morning and found information about dyscalculia from this website which was very helpful.
  • I watched this dyscalculia simulation, which is to help the rest of us understand the struggles of people who have this learning disability.
  • I found a list of curricula for people with dyscalculia. I found Math U See. It is too expensive for me.
  • I then remembered that Maria Montessori made everything multisensory. I searched up and found this video about teaching children about changing improper fractions into mixed numerals using the Montessori method.
  • As you can see in the book below, much of this book is from the video.
  • Some of the book below comes from questions my child-student had this morning after watching the video. 
  • I had some blank board books. What a nice thing to have. I thought, ‘I can plan a book sng then make it.’ I made 3 plans. 
  • I made the book, which is a combination of the 3 plans (a 4th plan, which is silly but true).
  • Since I did graduate with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art, I illustrated the book myself.
  • Now I need a publisher. More people need this book. I do not want to make lots of handmade copies!

3-D View of Fractions 5th Grade math concept book for people with dyscalculia
Cover Page: Change Improper Fractions to Mixed Numerals
1 Pizza Whole Number, 2/5 a pizza partial number
Improper Fraction
improper fraction, mixed numeral
7 divided by 5 or 7/5
fraction numerator denominator quotient mixed numeral