The Eleventh Article of Faith and What it Does Mean and Does Not Mean for LDS Homeschool Mothers in Regard to the Education of their Children

Elder Renlund’s Religious Freedom Symposium Speech in Brazil, 2017
Elder Renlund just gave this speech in Brazil at the Religious Freedom Symposium. I know there are many members of my church who are going to interpret the meaning of his words differently. I wanted to present my beliefs about what it does and does not mean for LDS Homeschool moms in regard to the education of their children.

In my opinion, Elder Renlund is saying that we need to know that religious freedom and “allowing all men to worship how when or what they may,” (11th Article of Faith of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) is good for all people and all society everywhere around the world, to have as law and to have in their hearts as individuals.

These are things he did not say and did not mean by his speech:

  • He did not say that this means we must teach our children equally about all religions and their beliefs from when they are small children and then allow them to choose a religion after having exposed them equally to each and every other religion out there.
  • He did not say that we must allow educators of our children to teach our children whichever beliefs the teacher wants to teach to our children.
  • He did not say that we must associate equally by giving equally of our time with non-believers (people not of our own faith) and with believers (those of our own faith).

This is what I believe about LDS Homeschool moms need to do and do not need to do to uphold religious freedom while taking advantage of religious freedomfor their own family at the same time:

  • You can be, but you do not have to be, in a homeschool co-op that is for homeschool families of all faiths. You are not hiding your light under a bushel if you choose to only be part of groups which are for the education of your children, which include LDS perspectives, instruction and references and which are taught by a teacher who is LDS.
  • You can teach your children about respecting the religious beliefs of others by not saying bad things about any other religion, by pointing out the differences in our faith and the faith of others in a repectful manner.
  • You can talk to the homeschool moms who have different religious beliefs in front of your children, about her religious beliefs, in a kind manner, being a good listener and showing the greatest of respect for her and her beliefs.
  • You do need to go to large homeschooling community group events such as picnics, field day and field trips, which are for homeschooling people of sundry faiths. You do not need to attend all of them, but attending some is good for you and your family and for those in your community.
  • You do not have to feel okay with the idea of your children being taught homeschool lessons about any subject, by a homeschool mom or by anyone, who is of another faith.
  • Elemetary aged kids are very vulnerable to believing everything they hear from adults, even when they are not their parents and expecially if there is the appearance that their mom endorses the teachings because she set up the teaching opportunity. Junior High children can handle being taught by teachers of another faith a little more than small children. High School kids can handle it even more. However, as for me and my house, I have decided to no longer allow people of other faiths to teach any homeschool class or lesson to my children of any age, unless I feel confident that it is a public and community situation which does not allow religious beliefs to enter into the discussion.
  • Humanism is Taught in Accredited Schools all over the World. It is a Religion.

A Really Great LDS Homeschooling Essay!

This is SO GOOD! Oh, my. You have to read this and share it with everyone you know who is LDS!

You have to read and share this! It is SO WELL WRITTEN!!!!

Oompa Loompas Chapter 16, with Math

My kids have been doing math this morning as I have read to them. Surprisingly, it helps them get it done faster, and I do not know why. It is some kind of brain thing. I think it is because they are using both sides of the brain at the same time. Maybe you could try it. It has been amazing. Of course, I did have to keep saying, “Keep doing your math.”

L.D.S. Homeschool Curriculum Web Site List

First, check out my Curricula here: L.D.S. Homeschool Products at my Teachers Pay Teachers store

Next, I have tried to make a fairly comprehensive list of LDS Homeschool Curricula. This is for teaching of Doctrines and Scriptures of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and for academics from the LDS perspective.

I have compiled this list so that you will now have the same trouble I had in finding great LDS Homeschooling Curricula and Resources. I am really excited about this. I hope this helps a lot of new and experienced homeschool parents in getting what they need in order to teach homsechool with an LDS perspective.

I am using Life School, Discover the Scriptures and Finch Family Games a lot in my homeschool, but some of these others look worth trying, too. My advice is to try samples of each and see what works best for your family! I warn you against buying a full curriculum without sampling it. I also advise searching for reviews and asking around before outting money into any of this!

Happy Discovering, and please tell others about this resource! Thanks!

About LDS Homeschooling:

Notes About Michelle Stone’s ‘Celestial Education’ DVD (available on YouTube and Vimeo)

These Teach Homeschool Academics with LDS Gospel Lessons:

Brite Music K-2 Plus Values and Safety Education
Keystone Ed by Tresta Neil

LIFE School K-8

Latter-Day Learning

Textbook Publishers (Kimber, Skousen)


Jenny Phillips Curriculum (k-3; 4-6 in the works; appears to be LA only)

Kindred Learning

Discover the Scriptures

Courageous Beings

Polar Star Studies

Building Heroes Academy (k-6)

Learning To Read Using the Book of Mormon

Mormon Little Books

The House

My LDS Preschool

Love to Learn by LDS former Homeschool Mom and now Grandma Curricula kits, homeschool supplies, and guidebooks

Resources for Teaching Academics from an LDS perspective:

Simplified scriptures for early readers (1st or 2nd graders)
Timelines, etc.

Book of Mormon Sight Words Flashcards
Living History Books

Teaching Self-Government

iPlates

Milestones Academy

Hold 2 the Rod

Moorhouse Academy Curriculum Blog
Resources for teaching One week sample here

Devotionals, Coloring Pages, Scripture Printables for posting & Copywork Pages

Science and Religion, LDS perspective book by David Barker

LDS doctrine to very young kids:

Faith in God Activity Booklets for Boys and Girls made by a homeschool mom
Brick of Mormon

Finch Family Games

Hatch Patch

In His Image (ages 5-7)

L.D.S. Notebooking Booklets (free downloads)
Book of Mormon

Early / Easy Readers

Learning to Read Using the Book of Mormon

Learn to Read Using the Book of Mormon Reader

The Friend Magazine

LDS-Notebooking TPT Store

Resources for Teaching Youth the Scriptures and Doctrine:

2016 LDS.org Curricula
Book of Mormon Study Guide

The Golden Plates Comic Book

For the Strength of Youth

Church Youth Theme for 2015

Preach My Gospel lessons

Academic Curriculum Created by LDS People:

Confessions of a Homeschool Mom

Melissa Cloud’s TPT store


Krista Wallden’s TPT store

Melonheadz TPT store

Confessions of a Homeschooler
Grade-Level Packages

Joy School (Preschool)

Other Resources

A Thomas Jefferson Education

The Helpful Garden (free Montessori Printables)

Facebook group for Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints who Homeschool

Note: If YOU have a curriculum or resource that would fit into any of these lists, and want yours included here, I would be happy to add it. Please send me a message! Thanks!


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LDS Homeschooling Northern Utah fb page

JPG Memes: Quotes From LDS General Authorities about LDS Homeschooling

jacob 2

Paul B Piper Seventy 2012 Secular

Heber C Kimball outline ping flowers

John Taylor grains truth

LDS Homeschooling Memes Brigham Young 1 o

Elder Dallin H. Oaks civic education

LDS Homeschooling Northern Utah facebook page

LDS Homeschoolers Are “In the World But Not Of The World.”

I just got a lecture about my kids disobeying LDS church leaders, who say we must public school so that we can be “in the world, but not of the world.” This person said that the person giving the General Conference talk said that we must be part of the public education system to be “living in this world.”

Joyce Kinmont says the church believes in parental choice on the matter

YouTube Video Joyce Kinmont LDS Church policy on homeschool or public school



Mormon Momma’s answer is a good one. Click here to read it!


L.D.S. Homeschool Northern Utah fb page

Teaching Empathy, the Social Emotion; High E.Q.

I highly recommend these two books I have. Get them!!!    

The Difference: Never in a Public or Charter School

2 of my kids went to public school for few years and 2 have never been to public school, nor to a charter school. I wanted to write about how I honestly feel about this.

I am so glad 2 of mine have never been to elementary school. My 2 older ones learned things I cannot unteach them. One of my kids feels constant pressure and constantly compares herself to others. She feels pressure to “stay at the top” and to be doing exactly what her top performing oublic schooled peers are doing! My son who public schooled still talks about killing at the drop of a hat, which he learned at public school recess. He also unlearned empathy and kindness. They both learned things like: learning is drudgery, mom’s job is to clean up (like the custodian’s job is to clean up), if someone is crying, ignore them and do your work, kids who are normal do not like their siblings, people must play with kids their own age, and much more, that I have been working on unteaching them.

My daughter who never went to public school has been doing very well in learning and I would say she learned so much more and is so much more advanced than her older siblings were at her age. It is amazing how much farther ahead some can get if not sent to school to get behind. 

Do not take a kid who could learn Items A through J that you want then to learn in homeschool and send them to public school so that they can learn A through d that you want thej to learn and A through J that you do NOT want then to learn and some that you may never be able to unteach them!

As for junior high and high school, my two oldest are now in baseball and softball. They said their teammates use swearwords like crazy and it bothers them really bad. My daughter is also bothered by how immodestly her teammates dress for softball games. I told them ai am so sorry and tood them, that is the way it is in Junior High and High School. 

I think today, I will have a talk with her about doing something bood and brave–asking her teammates not to use those words in her presence. I have done that in my life, and it has worked. People will respect people if you ask them to boldly.

Some people want their kids to have the social experiences that come with public school. I think without those social experiences, my kids will be fine. They have the positive social experiences I think kids need from other kids growing up, without all the negative social experiences I had growing up. 

My girls and I recently went to a homeschooled mothers and daughters retreat and learned a lot of really great, positive and uplifting things in a very social setting. My sons and I are going to go to the same, but with boys and their moms. It is great that the social experiences they have are positive and healthy, and chosen by me. I do not get to handpick which boye and which moms will come to this upcoming event, but the fact that I will be there and lots of moms will be there, helps! 

My eldest daughter just got to go to her first boy/girl dance and she is 7th grade age. It was part of a weekend of learning and socialization with peers. The kids were homeschooled and of our religion (LDS) and they learned how to be queenly or how to be chivalrous. They learned table manners at a special dinner in semi-formal attire. They played games which teach moral and leadership lessons. They had classes and listed to speakers. It was like an LDS Youth Conference, only there were just 18 kids there (plus 20 more who just cane to the dance) and they were all homeschoolers. My daughter laughed, learned and really enjoyed herself. She said the boys were not shy and were great at conversationalism. She said, “they were not how you said they’d be.” She seemed to have had a great experience. She is full of wonder and excitement. She danced with 10 boys. Her experience was very different from my first 7th grade dance.

My first 7th grade dance found me in shock. The music had lyrics that were awful and made the Holy Ghost leave. They music was so loud! There was not much lighting, so it was really dark. It was extremely crowded and I remember feeling a great fear and nervousness. I remember praying it would be over soon. Boys were not asking girls to dance and girls were huddled in groups. Everyone was pretending to have fun, even though I bet most felt as nervous as I did. I had friends who “set me up” with boys who were short like me, because that is what you gotta have in common–height. I know they meant well, but from that I learned that even some of my friends only saw me as “our friend who is short.” My companion dancers and I were so afraid and hardly talked to one another. We did not have much in common. We did not have similar interests. We did have fear of school dances in common! 

Mormon/ Latter-Day Saint vs. Secular Percentages of Influence in Our Homeschool

  
I was fiddling with percentages of:

1) all-inclusive, wordly, teachers not exclusively LDS, secular, fitting in with the homeschool community, etc.

compared to percentage of:

2) exclusive, Godly, teachers exclusively LDS active members, gospel-based, standing out from the rest of the homeschool community.
I wish to figure out what percentages I want of each for my family’s homeschool.

Examples of #1:

Secular Homeschool Co-Op Group

Secular math

Secular fiction reading

Secular non-fiction reading

Homeschool all-inclusive social event

Shopping at a store

Local Natural History Museum

Local Art Museum or Gallery

Local play

Dance class

Gymnastics class

Swimming lessons

City Easter Egg Hunt

Bill Nye the Science Guy DVD’s

Any Secular Movies or DVD’s

LDS teachers when not allowed to teach with LDS influences, principles or doctrine

Friendship time with non-LDS people
Examples of #2:

L.I.F.E. School LDS curriculum

Discover the Scriptures Curriculum

Reading the Scriptures, church magazines, listening to conference

Attending church or church activities

Going to an LDS family activity

LDS teachers when allowed to teach LDS principles and doctrine

Friendship time with LDS people

Activities or social events including LDS people exclusively

LDS-exclusive learning Co-Op groups

Family History research, reunions, dinners, etc.

Family Home Evening

General Conference
If I take everything I do in our homeschool, figure what amount of hours per year we spend on each, and then figure percentages, then:

What would the percentages be if I used these 2 categories only?

How do I want it to be for my family?

I have not done the math, but just looking casually here, I am guessing that less than 25% of what we do is in #2. I  want that influence to be higher. I would rather it be 50/50 or maybe with the LDS influencers being at 75%.

LDS Homeschooling Northern Utah fb page

LDS Women Can Make Academic Curriculum!

One really great quote by President Brigham Young on LDS Homeschool Curriculum Writing and Publishing is here below.

“We want to make our own school books. We are paying now from thirty thousand to sixty thousand dollars a year for school books that can be made here just as well as to send and buy them abroad. This is carrying out the plan and principles of building up Zion, whether you know it or not. We may preach until Doomsday, and tell how Zion will look, how wide her streets will be, what kind of dwellings her people will have, what kind of carriages and what fine horses they will have, and what a beautiful looking set of people they will be, but it is all nonsense to talk about what we will never reach if we do not stop our folly and wickedness. We have the privilege of building up and enjoying Zion, and I am telling you how to do it. We want the women, from this time forth, to go to work and save the paper rags, and we will make the paper for them. And they can learn to make type. I can pick hundreds and hundreds of women out of this congregation that could go into a shop and make type just as will as men, it is a trifling thing. And they can learn to set type, and they can learn how to write for our school books. We have plenty of men and women that know how to write books, and how to teach too. We have just as good school teachers here as any in the world.”

President Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses 16:17)

He made a great point here, or a few great points. We cannot just talk about Zion. We have to have actions that show sincerity. We have to show faith by our actions. What, in 2015, are people waiting for? Zion is not something that President Monson is going to create for us, then invite us to join in on. Zion is something that united LDS people will create by coming together, having faith and being determined.

Brigham Young is also telling us here, that we LDS members must educate our own kids, that we have those among us talented and able, to write curriculum, design it, get it printed and publish it. We already have much selection in LDS Homeschool Curricula. We have the talent among us to make even more!

I am working on math standards created by piecing togehter the following:

Pre Common Core Utah Math Standards
Constance Kamii math principles, as covered in her Piaget-based research
My own math education (what was taught each year when I was in school)
What I know of my childrens’ abilities at each age
What I know about teaching math at home
What kids need the most in real life, put first
What I want my kids to know at each age
Math divided by topic, then by subtopic, first, and, last, by grade level within the topic and subtopic; Also, math divided by grade level, then by topic and subtopic (so that a parent can teach using one or the other)

If I can do this, why can others who are LDS not also do this? Ehy must we depend on members of other churches making “Christian” curricula? Why should we depend on non-LDS teachers? We can teach our own children. We can! I know, because I can. I know you can, too!

I know many of you who di homeschool ar thinking that the academic strength of LDS Homeschool Curricula is likely not good. I challenge those who think this to go onto the LDS Homeschool Curricula page, click on the links which I have labeled for having academics taught from an LDS Perspective, get samplea of these and try them out with your kids.

For those of you who are not yet homeschooling, I challenge you to contact someone you know personally who home educates and ask them for a tour of their homeschool set-up in their house, with some information on how they do it. I also suggest you join a facebook grouo for local homeschoolers and local LDS homeschoolers, so that you can go to group events and meet these people while you are making this decision about whether to do this yourself.

Please also go with your spouse to the temple, praying before and after about whether it be right to LDS homeschool your kids. I know that Heavenly Father knows what is best for you and yours.

Heavenly Father was involved in our decision to LDS Homeschool. I also recently received personal revelation that I need to unite the local LDS Homeschooling Community, so that we may be one in God’s hands (for if we are not one, we are not his). This blog post is part of that effort. I hope it helps many people!

I share this in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.

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LDS Homeschooling Northern Utah fb page