L.D.S. Homeschool Curriculum Web Site List

First, check out my Curricula here: L.D.S. Homeschool Products at my Teachers Pay Teachers store

Next, I have tried to make a fairly comprehensive list of LDS Homeschool Curricula. This is for teaching of Doctrines and Scriptures of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and for academics from the LDS perspective.

I have compiled this list so that you will now have the same trouble I had in finding great LDS Homeschooling Curricula and Resources. I am really excited about this. I hope this helps a lot of new and experienced homeschool parents in getting what they need in order to teach homsechool with an LDS perspective.

I am using Life School, Discover the Scriptures and Finch Family Games a lot in my homeschool, but some of these others look worth trying, too. My advice is to try samples of each and see what works best for your family! I warn you against buying a full curriculum without sampling it. I also advise searching for reviews and asking around before outting money into any of this!

Happy Discovering, and please tell others about this resource! Thanks!

About LDS Homeschooling:

Notes About Michelle Stone’s ‘Celestial Education’ DVD (available on YouTube and Vimeo)

These Teach Homeschool Academics with LDS Gospel Lessons:

Brite Music K-2 Plus Values and Safety Education
Keystone Ed by Tresta Neil

LIFE School K-8

Latter-Day Learning

Textbook Publishers (Kimber, Skousen)


Jenny Phillips Curriculum (k-3; 4-6 in the works; appears to be LA only)

Kindred Learning

Discover the Scriptures

Courageous Beings

Polar Star Studies

Building Heroes Academy (k-6)

Learning To Read Using the Book of Mormon

Mormon Little Books

The House

My LDS Preschool

Love to Learn by LDS former Homeschool Mom and now Grandma Curricula kits, homeschool supplies, and guidebooks

Resources for Teaching Academics from an LDS perspective:

Simplified scriptures for early readers (1st or 2nd graders)
Timelines, etc.

Book of Mormon Sight Words Flashcards
Living History Books

Teaching Self-Government

iPlates

Milestones Academy

Hold 2 the Rod

Moorhouse Academy Curriculum Blog
Resources for teaching One week sample here

Devotionals, Coloring Pages, Scripture Printables for posting & Copywork Pages

Science and Religion, LDS perspective book by David Barker

LDS doctrine to very young kids:

Faith in God Activity Booklets for Boys and Girls made by a homeschool mom
Brick of Mormon

Finch Family Games

Hatch Patch

In His Image (ages 5-7)

L.D.S. Notebooking Booklets (free downloads)
Book of Mormon

Early / Easy Readers

Learning to Read Using the Book of Mormon

Learn to Read Using the Book of Mormon Reader

The Friend Magazine

LDS-Notebooking TPT Store

Resources for Teaching Youth the Scriptures and Doctrine:

2016 LDS.org Curricula
Book of Mormon Study Guide

The Golden Plates Comic Book

For the Strength of Youth

Church Youth Theme for 2015

Preach My Gospel lessons

Academic Curriculum Created by LDS People:

Confessions of a Homeschool Mom

Melissa Cloud’s TPT store


Krista Wallden’s TPT store

Melonheadz TPT store

Confessions of a Homeschooler
Grade-Level Packages

Joy School (Preschool)

Other Resources

A Thomas Jefferson Education

The Helpful Garden (free Montessori Printables)

Facebook group for Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints who Homeschool

Note: If YOU have a curriculum or resource that would fit into any of these lists, and want yours included here, I would be happy to add it. Please send me a message! Thanks!


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LDS Homeschooling Northern Utah fb page

Public School, Homeschool and Behavior Issues

My son used to have major behavioral and psychological issues when in public school. In a week, I noticed slight changes. In a month, I noticed more changes. After 3 months, his issues had been cut to 60% what they were when he had been in public school. After one year of homeschooling, I think the behavior issues were about 40% what they had been in public school. Now it has been almost 3 years. He is older, so, granted, that could make a difference, too, BUT I think homeschooling has made a bigger difference than age. He has behavior issues still, but they are down to about 20% what they were when he was in public school.

I wonder so often, whether they would even exist, had he never been in public school, but that does not solve anything, so I shouldn’t.

I will tell you some things that I think made a difference for my son. They are important to me. I cannot guarantee they will work for you. Every family will do different things. I am sure something here could help someone, though, so here it is.

When I began, I had already read about 6 books written by amazing author Alfie Kohn, including “Unconditional Parenting” and “The Schools Our Children Deserve,” which I recommend you start with. His books are very thick because of solid references which are in the back of the books. These take up about one third of the book. I looked at the references and used them to decide which books to read next. These were also very helpful.

I love “The NDD Book,” about how your child getting enough sleep, exercise and the right nutrition, will spfor sure affect his or her behavior. My child does get more sleep out of public school, because if, for example, we happen to stay up late on a Thursday night, visiting relatives or something, the he sleeps in the next morning (Friday). When we do an exhausting field trip, project, co-op or gathering, he eats and naps. He naps whenever he needs it and I let him, because he does not do it very often, and I have talked with him about how his body will tell him when he needs it. Usually when he has a meltdown, we feed him (that helps) and then he will go lie down for a one hour nap. When he gets up again, he is cheerful, kind, helpful, obedient, etcetera.

We have discussed what works best for him, with him. He likes this. When we forget to do this for a while, things do not work as well. He also needs regular one on one love and individual attention. Before he really “got into” reading, I used to get up in the morning and, first thing, read to him sitting in a chair in his room, to help him wake up. I read for half an hour. This helped him get out of bed cheerfully. It also helped him feel loved and helped us bond. I cannot deny that it made him love books, as well.

I teach my kids via eclectic homeschooling, and one thing included in 60 to 90% of our homeschool, depending in the day, week and month, and what is going on, is letting him learn however he wants, and whatever he wants, as long as it is within our religious standards. A lot of people call this unschooling, but I prefer to just describe it, as the “un” has such negative connotations. He learns a ton this way, and the freedom of this approach takes away a lot of behavior issues.

We also use an LDS curriculum called “L.I.F.E. School.” “L.I.F.E. Stands for Life Integrated Family Education.” The kids all get the same lesson. Then they do their work, which is similar, so they can help one another, but it is different for each grade level. I love it. It makes things so much easier for me. I do not have to do as much work to out things together for my kids to learn. The gospel is woven into every lesson. It teaches art, geography, history, science, literature, poetry, theater, reading, grammar, paleography, spelling, and many types of writing. It teaches dictionary work and research, essay

The only subject not included in this curriculum is Math. I am fine with that. I work hard at math teaching, most of the time. When I do not, I have to make up for it later.