Changing Improper Fractions into Mixed Numerals: a Book by Lisa C. Jackson

Changing Improper Fractions into Mixed Numerals
I wrote this book because I suspect my child has dyscalculia. I am trying to prepare my child-student for the TABE and GED tests. I am hoping this will help people with dyscalculia and those who teach them. I think this book will be helpful to 5th grade school teachers, homeschool moms, middle school and junior high and high school teachers, adult education teachers and those learning math for the GED test.

This is how this book came to be:

  • My dad always taught us math around the dinner table and everywhere we went. My siblings and I helped him check math papers quite often. I was always reading and hearing maht vocabulary like “whole numbers,” “improper fractions,” and “numerator.” My dad loved teaching math to 5th graders. This is considered 5th grade math in most curricula.
  • When I had a hard time understanding math, I had my school teacher, my dad and my math-loving brother who could explain everything to me. I did not need visual explanations of things because I had so much help.
  • However, I am an artist and visuals like these with very concise explanation of every little detail would have been nice.
  • When I was in elementary school, I visualized how the design of the math textbook could improve. I dreamed of becoming a textbook math designer one day just to make the math book easier for the child to understand by adding better visuals.
  • I became a homeschool mom. I have taught homeschool 5 years and have not yet found all the answers for how to teach math concepts to every child. 
  • For 5 years, I have been eluded as to how to explain certain things which are very easy for me to understand, to children to whom these math concepts do not come so readily.
  • I became determined to figure out how to help children (and all people) understand math concepts better.
  • I love the Montessori method. I want to meet Maria Montessori when I get to heaven. I also love Constance Kamii and her methods for teaching math.
  • I am an eclectic-style homeschool mom. That means I like teaching using multiple methods. 
  • I used my “Your Teacher” app yesterday and wrote down all of the lesson names in all of the chapters in each grade level and math level, with checkboxes nest to each lesson. I made a plan to have my kids watch 5 lessons per day from this app. I knew this would help. It did, because helped me to see which pieces of the puzzle my children were missing for the complete understanding of these math concepts regarding fractions.
  • I googled this morning and found information about dyscalculia from this website which was very helpful.
  • I watched this dyscalculia simulation, which is to help the rest of us understand the struggles of people who have this learning disability.
  • I found a list of curricula for people with dyscalculia. I found Math U See. It is too expensive for me.
  • I then remembered that Maria Montessori made everything multisensory. I searched up and found this video about teaching children about changing improper fractions into mixed numerals using the Montessori method.
  • As you can see in the book below, much of this book is from the video.
  • Some of the book below comes from questions my child-student had this morning after watching the video. 
  • I had some blank board books. What a nice thing to have. I thought, ‘I can plan a book sng then make it.’ I made 3 plans. 
  • I made the book, which is a combination of the 3 plans (a 4th plan, which is silly but true).
  • Since I did graduate with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art, I illustrated the book myself.
  • Now I need a publisher. More people need this book. I do not want to make lots of handmade copies!

3-D View of Fractions 5th Grade math concept book for people with dyscalculia
Cover Page: Change Improper Fractions to Mixed Numerals
1 Pizza Whole Number, 2/5 a pizza partial number
Improper Fraction
improper fraction, mixed numeral
7 divided by 5 or 7/5
fraction numerator denominator quotient mixed numeral




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Teaching my Adorable Child to Read

I have been very diligent and enthusiastic lately in teaching my son to read better. It is going well. Today I got the Book of Mormon Little Books in the mail. Yesterday I got the Book of Mormon Sight Words Flash Cards in the mail. I just not added them into our reading program. This means I did two things. Today, I put the Book of Mormon Little Books as every other book in the stack of books in my son’s “Learn to Read” container. Last night, I went throught the Book of Mormon Sight Words Flash Cards and sorted through them. First, I made a group out all of the phoenetic cvc words. Then I made a set of all if the cvcv phoenetic words. Next I made a group out of all the non-phoenetic words I think he has already learned from the books he has been reading to me. Finally, I made a set of all the words which I think are commonly found in easy reader books which he does not yet know. I want him to learn these soon.

Every day, I have him read to me from books for about 20 minutes and read me flash cards for about 10 minutes. I have a mix of Book of Mormon Little Books, 1960’s whole language readers, “Meet the Sight Words” Level 1 books and Collection 1 “Bob Books.” Most of the flash cards review words he has read often in the books. Some of them, he would forget if we did not keep up with the flash cards. Some of the flash cards are words I would like him to know soon. I added in the words used on worksheets commonly, such as “name,” “add” and “subtract.” I also have numbers and the words for the numbers, 1-20, in there.

“Tip,” Paul McKee et. al., 1960s early reader

From Whom Should the Children Learn?

Let’s discuss whose job it is to teach our kids. Let’s talk about nature. Here are a few examples from nature:

  • There are always ducklings waddling behind their schoolteacher ducks and the schoolteacher ducks have been taught how to teach waddling to their students, by the government ducks. The schoolteacher ducks are the only ducks properly trained to teach swimming, diving for food, seeking mates, quacking, defense strategies, pecking, preening of feathers, flying and running. Parent ducks are only the ducks who provided life.
  • Lion cubs are always taken from their moms when they learn how to whelp, and put in dens led by schoolteacher lions. These schoolteacher lions are the only ones properly trained to teach the correct standards in being Lions. Schoolteacher lions have specialized tools for the training in hunting. They have been given the tools by the Centralized Lion Government. They are the only ones able to teach roaring in the correct way. They are the only ones given the knowledge of how to teach the little lions and lionesses how to pass the lion tests (of course, they do not know what is on the tests–that would be wrong–only the government knows).
  • Fish swim in schools because they leave their parents immediately and their parents do not swim in the same school with them (because that would be ridiculous). The little ones swim with ocean life of many species, born at the same time they were. They are taught safety and science by a schoolteacher. We learn this in the movie, “Finding Nemo,” wherein a stingray is the valued and respected teacher for many species from the same area. They must be taught alongside other species because diversity is valued and, after all, learning alongside a bunch of others in their own species or family, would be very laughable.

This makes it logical and natural for children not to be taught and nurtured by parents, but by teachers who are trained to teach Federal government-approved standards. Learning from  parents and in the company of siblings is downright unnatural. Even ducks do not learn that way (as I have established above).

I am a Homeschool Mom, Which Means I Am a Teacher!

I am so tired of being excluded from conversations because I am seen as the wrong kind of teacher. I try so hard to get into conversations with full time paid teachers to let them know that I have so many experiences similar to theirs, and so much in common with them. Why can’t they see me as a teacher, too? I also worry about curriculum. I teach fractions, too. I teach reading, too. I teach kids to discuss stories and their meanings, too. I search for lesson plan ideas, too. I get worried over how to get kids excited about creative writing, too. I read aloud to my kids, too. I work late into the night and plan all summer, too. I get worn out and exhausted from working with kids all day, too.

Sure, we also have our differences. The problem is, all that the public school teachers see, are the differences, the things we do not have in common. If you are a public school teacher, please do not exclude homeschool moms from the conversation! We have a lot in common. Can we not just focus on what we have in common, instead of fretting over how we are different?

I have seen worksheets used by public school teachers, made by homeschool moms. It was found in the credits at the bottom of the sheet. I have used things made by public school teachers, found on Pinterest, made by public school teachers.

Granted, I do not have to do tests or common core, but I still think we can be friends. Perhaps when we do not see one another as someone to be feared, things will get better. If we help each other, things will improve for both homeschool moms and public school teachers!

Montessori Pink words set 2

Montessori Pink words set 2

I made this 2nd set because my daughter had mastered the 1st set I made. She did very well and I am afraid she will breeze through it, soon. I went to thehelpfulgarden.blogspot.com to find out what to do next. I printed a bunch of stuff. I cut some of it out. I need more white printer cardstock now. I use so much for montessori stuff. I love the montessori method. It seems to work, even though I don’t follow it fully.

I also decided we’ll do 2 pages in our Discover The Book of Mormon Books, each day, instead of 1. I feel we are moving too slowly through it. I love it. It teaches the kids so much and teaches me so much, too. It rocks. I highly recommend it.

I have decided to stop posting homeschool stuff on Facebook, except for other homeschool families to see. I think people get the wrong impressions about homeschool, and I’d rather give them no impressions at all, than the wrong ones.