Homeschooling: A Lighter Load for Spring

I have gone to a lighter load already. My kids now do one assigned pencil drawing (art) assignment and a chore on Friday. Other than that, Friday is an unschooling style day. During the week, my kids do (in this order) one “spelling workout” lesson (4 pgs. long, including vocabulary, grammar and one paragraph of writing), 2 pages of “handwriting without tears” workbook, one worksheet of math in a binder I created for each child (from multiple sources), a half hour of reading non-fiction science book of choice, a half hour of reading non-fiction history book of choice, a half hour of reading fiction book of choice, a chore, and a half hour to two hours of interest-based learning (depending upon age).
This gives them more choices and they love it. Their spelling, vocabulary and writing skills are great. They are learning math every day. They get to learn the history and science that peaks their interest that day. I have a huge library of non-fiction books in all subjects and levels which I picked myself (and I am very picky) for them to read. I have a huge variety of fiction books for all levels and interests for them to choose from. 

We are constantly adding to our library, which makes the kids excited to see the new books. Sometimes, with their own money (the older they are, the more they generally earn), they buy books they are interested in.

As for the “boring” and “gave too much work,” I negotiate with my kids and change things up about every couple months. Last time, I took away some spelling (they used to do 2 lessons a day) and added the reading non-fiction (because my son wanted science in, and less spelling.

I also spend about two hours a week helping my eldest and about the same, teaching kids how to read and having then read to me (for the younger ones).

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Propogandizing Pearson-made Online Language Arts Assignment

This was posted online:

“I’m going to add kindle to the fire here and add the exact assignment which was the catalyst for all my research against Common Core. It was an online “Vocabulary” assignment (through pearsonsuccessnet) given last year, in CSD, to my fourth grader. I think it fits well in this thread of comments. Pure manipulation of a young mind: indoctrination at it’s best!”

O.k., First of all, what does this have to do with Language arts vocabulary teaching?

Second, why do we need a child to suggest to our child’s mind, that the government (they mean the federal government) should take on the responsibility if making sure everyone can read and write? Why does this not happen to be a girl thinking of an idea to have mothers and fathers make sure this happens? (Of course! They are too stupid and weak–sorry! I have forgotten this, here. Silly me!) Why does this not happen to be a girl thinking of writing a letter to her neighbor, to ask her neighbor to go volunteer in her local school to teach kids to read? (Oh, I know! That would maybe show less dependence on the feds– oopsy, we cannot have that!) It would maybe give some power and responsibility to local school districts and local adults read projects, instead of giving the power and responsibility to the feds. (Again, oopsy, that would not help with the propoganda goals!)

Third, um, you were studying the Constitution and thought of this idea. Yeah, when we were kids and studied the Constitution, I remember reading that one part where it makes me think of how the feds need to make sure everyone knows how to read and write. What part of the Constitution were your studying which made you come up with this, out of the blue, dear invented child?

As if!

Oh, and lest we forget, this is a LANGUAGE ARTS lesson!

*Special Note: Online lessons sometimes given to kids who do work online from home. Beware, homeschooling parents! This is an online lesson kids do from home! Watch out for things like this on your own computer screen at home!

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